Too Many Eggs? Make Homestead Deviled Eggs

At our peak, we had 34 chickens here at our Idaho homestead — Cuckoo Marans, Rhode Island Reds, Black Sex Links, Red Sex Links, Easter Eggers, bantams of all sorts, a big awesome rooster named Alice, and one super cute silver spangled Hamburg hen. Needless to say, it meant we often ended up with extra eggs since it’s just the two of us here.

Most frequently, I use the extra eggs to make “egg thing” — I guess it’s a crustless quiche? Frittata? Egg casserole? So, yeah, this is why we just call it “egg thing” and throw in whatever veggies we have in the house. We also frequently make hard-boiled eggs for snacks.

Hardboiled eggs

But our favorite thing to do with all those eggs? Deviled eggs. They are one of Winslow’s favorite foods ever and they’re not very hard to make (as long as you don’t want to get fancy and use a pastry piper, which as people with busy lives and lots of chores, we don’t — we just make little hatch marks with the fork).

Deviled eggs are also easy to change up and personalize to your tastes or just to have a different taste from batch to batch. So if you find you’ve got too many eggs floating around, give deviled eggs a try.

Easy Homestead Deviled Eggs

Ingredients:

  • 12 eggs
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon yellow or Dijon mustard
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • Paprika, for garnish

Note: For the mayonnaise you can use store-bought mayonnaise or make your own paleo mayonnaise. When I buy mayo, I buy the Just Mayo brand. While it does contain canola, it does not contain soy, which we personally find more offensive.

Deviled Egg IngredientsDirections:

  1. Place eggs in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water so the water is an inch or so above the eggs.
  2. Heat on high until water begins to boil.
  3. Cover and turn heat to low. Cook for 1 minute.
  4. Remove from heat and leave covered for 15-20 minutes, then rinse under cold water.
  5. Let cool completely.
  6. Crack shells and peel.
  7. Gently dry the eggs.
  8. Slice eggs in half lengthwise.
  9. Remove yolks and place in bowl. Set whites on a plate or in a serving dish.
  10. Mash yolks with fork.
  11. Add mayo, vinegar, mustard, salt, and pepper. Mix well.
  12. Spoon the yolk mixture back into the egg whites. If you want to get fancy, you can use a piping tool or poke cool fork patterns into the yolks once you’ve spooned in the filling. Our homestead is not that fancy. We’re hungry.
  13. Sprinkle with paprika and serve.

Hardboiled eggsIdeas for spicing it up:

  • Use chipotle or sriracha mayo instead of regular mayo. Just use more mayo and no mustard, if you try this.
  • Use horseradish instead of mustard.
  • Swap out half the mayo for some super ripe avocado.
  • Mince 1 stalk of celery and add it to the filling for some texture.

And no, Pixel, you cannot have any of the deviled eggs…

Hangry Pixel

  • Leslie R. Jenkins

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    By the way if You have a bumper crop of eggs You can hard cook them and pickle them in clear gallon jars.

  • Leslie R. Jenkins

    A pastry piper is a simple task made of a cone of paper and an adept with a pair of scissors , now You’ve time for that don-cha?

  • Leslie R. Jenkins

    About gold prospecting in Idaho, check out : goldrushnuggets.com