Elk Steak London Broil

Elk Steak London Broil

The classic London Broil is one of our favorite ways to prepare meat. The combination of marinating and fast, hot cooking makes for a great way to make more affordable meat taste fantastic. This approach works well with elk steak, as well.

Unlike conventional meat, elk meat (and other types of game) can vary greatly from animal to animal since they do not grow and live in a controlled environment. And while there are things you can do in the processing stage to make your animal taste better (aging, proper butchering, etc.), you can’t really change whether you got a tender animal or a tough animal. So marinating makes sense when it comes to game meat. (Although some people think it doesn’t do anything, I feel like it does.)

This variation of a beef London Broil recipe tastes great with the rich, unique flavor of elk. Vary your marinating times and cooking times depending on the thickness of your elk steak.

Elk Steak London Broil

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup red wine
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (use tamari if you’re gluten free)
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon course-ground or whole-grain mustard
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2lbs elk steaks

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients except elk steaks into a dish that you can seal tight. I use a plastic container with a lid that locks into place. Shake the ingredients until very well mixed.
  2. Lay the steaks out in the dish and gently score both sides of each steak. Go about an 1/8-inch deep and score diagonally in both directions.
  3. Close the container, shake the ingredients around, and marinate anywhere from 6-48 hours in your refrigerator depending on the thickness of your steaks. I try to flip my container about every 6 hours.
  4. Before cooking, remove the steaks from the marinade and pat them dry. Let them sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. I typically let them sit longer, but if you belong to what Winslow calls “the cult of refrigeration,” that might make you nervous. Short story: cold steaks don’t cook well.
  5. You can broil or pan fry the steaks (I know, it’s not really a London broil if you pan fry it, but technically this is a beef dish anyway, so have an open mind). Either way, make sure everything is nice and hot. Throw a bunch of butter in your pan if you’re frying your steaks or spray your broiler pan with cooking oil if you’re broiling to ensure your steaks don’t stick. Cook the steaks on each side for 3-6 minutes, depending on the thickness
  6. Test your steaks for doneness by using the finger test—don’t cut them open!
  7. Let the steaks stand for a few minutes before you slice them up.

We love to eat our elk steak with mashed potatoes and green beans to keep things simple, easy, and classic! (Not to mention, really tasty!)